click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130212
20130212
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46
f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be able to acknowledge others. i see police chief [
are at the heart of the this place the idea we call san francisco. you know, many of us came here from smoip else or their parents did. and whether it was guadalajara or a rural county in texas what brought us here was that hope where in san francisco as most places offered a better life. it was judged by a play we create not by a language we grew up with. we're a city that rewards the inno matter and the risktaker. fred and harvey ye very and willie brown and nancycy pelosi. we've known our share of adversity, earthquake and the problems with aids. we're not afraid to fail or doing what we know is right. and most importantly we know that none of us succeed alone whether it's in reconcile or business or life. we know as michelle obama said so well, this past summer when you walk through that door of opportunity you don't slam it shut you help someone else walk through that door behind you. my fellow san franciscans i know there's no limit to the opportunities in this city in we keep the door open. if we commit ourselves and put politics behind us we can help future generations and thank you go >>
young man, and god uses a son that doesn't speak to teach me so many things all day every day. i rarely talk about that because if it hits to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imag
. it is a good idea, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues
the game. mackenna missed it. alicia wins. let's hear it for alicia. that is a quick overview of how we use the wii. questions? the question is, do you have to have a special computer to connect the wii to a television? the answer is no. this box is the council. you plug the cd into it and plug into the tv. any television will work with the wii. it works well with a big flat screen tv because you can see the action better. good question. one more question. allen? the average cost? if you are one of the contract in city senior centers, this is part of our broadband technology grant, the average cost is zero. [laughter] if you were to buy this for your home, it costs a couple of hundred dollars. the games cost between $20.40 dollars. they have hundreds of different games to play. to the games cost between $20.40 dollars. and hundreds of different games to play. we have other adaptive devices that can be used with the wii. this is a foot pedal. -- this is a foot pedal. along with the buttons on the hand device connected to alicia's remote, we can use foot pedals if there are games the require
this, take a picture and send it to us. there is a man on the twenty fourth floor looking out the window with his camera. took a picture, looked at it, send it to us, we had it on the air and a couple of minutes. because of technology, because of things changing so rapidly. it is a brand new world. vicki, thank you for the importance of that network and everything else. thank you. next, i want to introduce you to a gentleman. he is tall, dark, handsome. sorry, that was me. wrong script. [laughter] you, too, right? it's your birthday, right? ok. in all seriousness, a gentleman by the name of dmitri is here. i want you to meet him. his name is dmitri belzer. he has worked in the disability community for years providing technology access for more than 30 years. trained as a sign language expert and interpreter, he established a death services program ast san francisco state university, provided support services for colleges. we don't call them disabled. they happen to have a disability. he joined pacific bell, helped organize honda the advisory group for people that happen to hav
to recovery . today, we'll be talking about youth and young adults in recovery. joining us in our panel today are tami bahr, assistant director, connections counseling, board member of recovery foundation, madison, wisconsin; jonathan katz, director, rita j. kaplan jewish community services, jewish board of family and children services, new york, new york; justin riley, at-large board member, faces and voices of recovery, seattle, washington; bridget ruiz, technical expert lead, division of systems improvement, jbs international, bethesda, maryland. bridget, 21.5 percent of 18- to 25-year-olds have an issue with illicit drugs. talk to me a little bit about that and what kind of drugs are they using. it is quite different than it was even 2 or 3 years ago. we see a huge increase in pharmaceutical drug use, not using it as prescribed. we also see an increase in alcohol use, and binge drinking is a serious problem, as well as some of the more legal types of drugs labeled as incense or those types of things in different smoke shops. and jonathan, does that hold true for what you are seeing in new
about globaltion people are local and jobs are local. each of us each day can fix the neighborhood. real progress is credit place specific and - this concreteness is one of the benefits of college track. it lift up one student after another it looks after and supports individuals. it stands or falls on the local individual concrete attention. there is nothing global about it's on the difference even though we believe that other institutions like ours with help the world. slowly we partially we build out. we're great deal of that mayor lee has chosen to make his first state of the city address here. it sends a message for all student in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to j
. for us that's not a big deal. there are a lot of murals in sacramento and san francisco that is all permission based. for us, we're kind of a sdae zero tolerance city in sacramento. you go out and you vandalize something, that's a crime. that's how we view that in our city. >> i tell them it's art, you got to express yourself but you cannot damage other people's property. i usually say how many of you have a little brother or sister, you don't want to teach them to steal. how do you feel when they mess up your stuff? that's how i approach it. >> also we try to leave that at the end where tibo, played by anthony over here, that's basically how the character evolves throughout the play, being this leader of this crew and, you know, he kind of teaches everybody but says, yeah, you have a leader but i ain't going to do what you are going to do. robert over here who plays damage, he's the antagonist. he's kind of damaged but at the end, you know, these guys, oh, hey, you know what, you gt a talent, let's turn that into some artistic talent, he's going to go to college to try to imp
with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your heart with me. a discussion on the importance of interface based leadership on the city's violence prevention initiative predict and organize for a safer san francisco is where we're opening up
and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew, who is here tonight. i want him to see me so he can follow my footsteps sunday to give back to the community. with me here are my managers and supervisors. i also have my longtime friend, jamie, who has been here. i see my former boss here. i have been nominated so many times. it really feels like you won an oscar. lastly, i wanted to thank my husband, who has been not just a husband to me, but he has been my chauffeur -- [laughter] mike coy cook, personal photographer, and no. 1 critic. i know i forgot so many people to
societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of the world, we would regard with that other country was doing as a massive violation of human rights. that's the way we would look at it. now, the other point here is what we're doing is not even consistent with american history. i mean, we had 500,000 people behind bars in 1980 and now we have 2.3 million, 2.4 million people behind bars and almost have 5,000 people behind bars just for a drug violation. there are as many people behind bars for a drug violation than we had for everything in 1980. it's not consistent with global standards and not consistent with our own history. it's costing a vast amount of money and i think what you see is for some of the d.a.'s and others are beginning to say enough is enough. we're seeing prison populations beginning to decline but when it comes down to the question,
and sin no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles defini
hope we're going back to blue and this was just a one-time thing. the last time we used yellow for the cover was when the commission sat in 1988 to consider the sales tax plan for transportation and it was a special color that we used just for that occasion because normally we use blue. >> i'm looking forward to red for valentine's day. >>> we already use pink for the minutes. >> we ran out of blue. >>> okay, and blue is very important to this agency, so, you know. >> i'm learning every day what's important to this agency. >>> interest you go. >> use red for the budget. >>> yes, the budget we don't want to be. my other comment was related to employee conduct. there was an article in yesterday's paper about employee conduct that's inappropriate and that staff is taking that very seriously. i believe that is true. i believe with an agency this big spread over as many counties that we are that it is entirely possible that people occasionally do the wrong thing. but i know that things are taken very seriously in hr and elsewhere within the organization where something is found, it
that increase the cost if it were 100% renewable? >> [speaker not understood]. when it's a dry year for us in the hetchy system, it's typically a dry year for everyone, which means there's upward price pressure in the electric market. so, he yes, i would expect that prices would be higher. yes, we would have to purchase more. we would have to meet whatever our commitment was to our customers in terms of the level of renewables. 100% renewable, we'd need to meet 100% renewable in our purchase plan. we would need to meet the mix requirements as well for, you know, what renewable product consistent with state law. and, so, that would serve as the floor and you could exercise discretion beyond that as to what the mix would be. that would be how you could dial in the pricing that keep it affordable in a high wholesale price year. but it's all those moving parts that we need to be managing under a scenario where we don't have a committed price like the shell project, with the shell approach. >> um-hm. >> yes. >> if i could just go back to slide 5 just for a minute. >> sure. >> can you help me un
in use it to helping people in need. first of all, i want to say that there is a special thing about this plasticity as it relates to ourselves. that is to say it is constructed on the basis of moment to moment association of things that go together or the things that are expected to occur in the next moment in time. one thing that always goes with everything we feel, everything we do, every act we have had, every thought is a reference to the actor, to the player, to the doer, and that references to ourself. all of that derives massive plastic self-reference. we have to construct and enrich a strongly center itself, a person, in our brain through its changing itself in a powerful, plastic way. we're also constructed through these same processes to attach to the other people, to the other things we are close to in life. that is the basis of the attachment of the mother to the child or the child to the mother. through millions of the events of contact and interaction, all of those counts in ways that actually grow the child into the person that is the mother. we are constructed to bui
and used his zeal and intelligence, his will to fight. he is a preacher, pastor, teacher, musician and a san francisco giant fanatic. [applause] and to all of you here today this issue of violence is a complex and challenging one. no one need to be self rightious about it because there is no instant answer to the things that all of us must. do i am impressed with the religious communities coming together. at least we should know that the issue today is peace is not the absence of noise. it's the presence of justice. when there is no justice there is no peace and when there is poverty and pain people search out for a bomb and put off that bomb. the excitement is that we're here today with each other. we at best can reach out to those who are not here because it's not just a matter can be solved with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play miami excited who will win that game. of the te
government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o ass
it here. because she knew how to use her computer and resources. i am with you. i need more lessons, obviously. i had the phone but not the knowledge. we're going to do something about that in my household. we're also doing something about living that far away from the center of everything, which is right here in the city. if you want to buy a house in the country would to a half acres, i have got one for you. it is is the morning as we all evolves, and as my husband and i get closer to 80, both of us have retired two times already. we're now getting ready for a third got around to remember, you could do as many as you like, too, because you're the only one that can say i am tired of doing that and i do not want to do it anymore. that is right. we have some people with real knowledge and not chitchat to come up and tell us how we can age at the same time that we are gaining insight, knowledge, and exposure to a vast universe of information and opportunity. so we are going to start with derek lamb, an aging service program specialist for the newly reorganized administration for commu
this is a great start. yes. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures
. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about the organization. >> we're 30 years old now. we started with 14 farmers, and it has grown out to over 80. >> what is the mission of the organization? >> this area has no grocery store spiller it is all mom-and- pop stores. we have this because it is needed. we knew it was needed. and the plaza needed somebody. it was empty. beautiful with city hall in the background. >> thank you for speaking with us. are you on the web? >> yes, hocfarmersmarket.org. >> check them out. thank you. >> welcome. the dish is ready. >> it looks and smells amazing. >> thank you. it was not easy to meet the $20 budget. i checked everybody out and found some great produce. really lovely seafood. i think that you are going to love it. >> do not be shy. cyou know this can run you $35 to $45 for a bowl, so it is great you did this for $20. >> this will feed four to six people. >> not if you invite me over for dinner. i am ready to dig in. >> i hope you'll love it. >> mmm. >> what do you think? >> i think i am going to need more. perhaps you can have all you wa
. as psychologists, we study abnormal behavior. anita shows distribution, most of us in here. you get anybody out here who is externalizing or anyone out here who is internalizing, as a psychologist, we try to bring them back in here so they're more healthy. that's what we study. when you're having problems in your life or any other area, if we can do something, talking to you versus talk therapy or medicine that might help you, what we're trying to do is get everybody back here so we're just kind of more balanced. with respect to the traumatic brain injuries and other types of things, that's much simpler for people to kind of understand that you had a concussive event or you had a t.b.i., traumatic brain injury, that's caused problems. we should be developing ways of helping to manage and treat those problems just like we do individuals who have the other types of problems. >> let me just add one thing there, which is it's a good question, but it highlights one of the challenges of introducing neuroscience today in the courtroom. at kent showed you some of his slides and mentioned during his tal
with a potentially problem situation? you know, tami used an important word, which was to have the conversation. i think that is crucial to begin to talk about what they see, what their concerns are and what is going on. it can be very challenging because, you know, as i think bridget and justin mentioned, adolescence is a time of experimentation. it's a time of risk taking. so, you know, one doesn't want to smother your kid or be what is referred to nowadays as a "helicopter parent," which my daughter accused me-but at the same time, one needs to have that conversation and begin to address the issues and point out what your concerns are and maybe set some parameters for what you are looking at and follow up. and see if things are not getting better, if you are seeing the same things that concern you, it's important to seek help, seek some kind of assessment. you know, what i am really troubled about is really the level of-among the 18- to 26-year-olds, that college age, the binge drinking that is taking place. we hear on the news time in and time out what it is doing, the number of accidents that
in an application or information, i have brochures, or you can give us a call. >> thank you. next is marked with wells fargo. >> hello, i work for wells fargo bank. i cover the northern california region. i usually focus on about $350 -- $350,000 of sbe loans. last year, for 2010, i did 43 loans. so we are lending. i usually focus on six different types of loans. start-ups, business acquisitions, real estate purchases with ti's, working capital, a partner buyouts, business expansion. when i am looking at a potential loan, i use the standard five c's of credit. the first one is character. what we are looking for is a minimum score around 640. we would like to say no recent bankruptcy foreclosures, bankruptcies, tax liens. if we see a loan that has been modified, we would like to see a reason it was modified, what ever reason it may be. it cannot be, i did not want to pay that payment any more. the second c, conditions. basically, how precise will the money be used? we are looking at a business plan. when you look at a business plan, that is just a start up. we are looking to see where there
of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to date, we haven't. in the future, we may wish to. >> i agree with that. i think that, first of all, the fact that everybody in the audience could control themselve
. cookies are so good, drove all other thoughts out of my head. thank you for taking time out it talk to us about what you do and the love with which you do it. we appreciate your time here on quick bites. i hope you've enjoyed our delicious tale of defendant 93 and dessert. as for me, my search is over. those reviews did not lie. in fact, i'm thinking of one of my very own. some things you just have it experience for yourself. to learn more about anthony's cookies, visit him on the web at anthoniescookies.com. if you want to watch some of our other episodes at sfquickbites/tumbler.com. see . >> we're going to go over search and rescue in this class, go over some buildings and how you assess buildings. you already had classes on utility controls, correct? how about medical? did medical? okay, as i said, my name is alec, i'm on truck 11. let's go into some light search and rescue. before you start, what do you do? stop, look, listen and think. any time you pull up to an incident or you see something, you take a breath, assess the situation, use all your senses and think about what you
. along the waterfront the mixed use development with the san francisco giants at c-3 lot will create vibrant new neighborhoods. and in less than 5 years we'll workman's compensation the golden state wares. a crumpling appear for parked cars will be transformed into a new arena bringing people closer to the waterfront and creating good jobs and year-round jobs. it will a be a short walk along the waterfront. leakage those kinds of opportunities attacking on a mba france should i say and privately finance and building a new facility on your water front only come once in a lifetime. we have a obligation to always put our people first and we must have the best opportunity for building all the facilities we need. i think that we have looerdz who are attentive to the neighbors and the public. well this is a partisanship that's meant to last. i look forward to doing this right. and sees this extraordinary opportunity. and as you can see our opportunity is not just think building it's about the international events we attract. and children and old will see a wonderful water space. last week
for taking time out it talk to us about what you do and the love with which you do it. we appreciate your time here on quick bites. i hope you've enjoyed our delicious tale of defendant 93 and dessert. as for me, my search is over. those reviews did not lie. in fact, i'm thinking of one of my very own. some things you just have it experience for yourself. to learn more about anthony's cookies, visit him on the web at anthoniescookies.com. if you want to watch some of our other episodes at sfquickbites/tumbler.com. see >> you're watching quick bites, the show that is san francisco. and today you're in for a real treat. oh, my! food inspired by the mediterranean and middle east with a twist so unique you can only find it in one place in san francisco. we're at the 55th annual armenian festival and bizarre. this is extra special not only because i happen to be armenian, but there is so much delicious food here. and i can't wait to share it with all of you. let's go. armenia, culture and cusine has had much cultural exchanges with its neighbors. today armenian food infuses he flavor fr
events. check us out on >> coming next on "california country," meet one couple who went from erving food to growing food, then take a trip to the school that is cooking up some of the top chefs in the world, and see how one family has been going and growing strong for more than 90 years now. plus learn some great new repes from some of our favorite chefs. that's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] welcome to the show. i'm your host tracy sellers. today we're in sacramento at one of the really iconic restaurants of this city, the riverside clubhouse. you know, it's a place that's known for, well, the large cow that's atop it. kind of unique, right? that brings us to our first story. you know, in san francisco, they have more than 3,500 restaurants, and it's a number that's constantly changing because of some closing and some opening, but we found one restaurant that takes the farm-to-floor concept to an entirely different level. you may remember matthew and terces engelhart from our story a few years ago. they're the owners of
grand jury. it is an excellent outreach item for us. we also have hal smith who is on the board [speaker not understood], and our current foreperson, mark [speaker not understood]. would you like to say anything about your jury service? >> well, i'm very grateful, one, to be selected. two, to have an incredible group of jurors to work with, representative of all aspects of san francisco communities and educational background. and it's been incredible to view what the city has to offer in a really intimate way. and we look forward to carrying on a rich tradition of following up with past reports, doing past juries proud, and we look forward to putting out some good reports. >> thank you. we also have, and i'm not going to call you out because i don't want anybody to [speaker not understood] we have several current jurors here and a number of former jurors here also. as kate said, the california jurors is comprised of [speaker not understood]. at the chapter here, we very much [speaker not understood] with the courts in recruiting and publicizing what the grand jury is all about. most peop
refresh the fleet with staggered procurements. they have been coordinated with us for the other project and now that the locally preferred alternative has been selected this procurements are moving forward so all of this is to say that in the fall the board approved the programming, or the reprogramming of 40 million of the $57 million it left about $10 million left for programming. also in the fall the authority board allocated about $16 million for the procurement of about 60 40-foot electric diesel hybrid coaches and these are important projects as far as transit performance and reliability. there is no substitute for getting new vehicles and replacing and refreshing the fleet. this is the second part of the amendment to program the remainder of the funds. this will align prop k funds and leveraging $210 million of federal funds that are anticipated to be available over the next two years. and they provide a local match. they released the capital transit priorities plan and this is in accordance with that. also -- although mta is pushing out when the vehicles are procured it's
. if a project passes screening eligibility we use the local criteria that consists of five criteria of the first is project type and we rank those in descending order so the top ranking project is zero emissions non vehicle projects and bicycle improvements and transit improvements and traffic calming and other programs. then we have shuttle services that provide trips of transit. then we have alternative fews vehicles project and finally any other project eligible to the governing legislation. the next is emissions reduceed in cost effectiveness. here we give priorities to projects that gain this and that is measured by the amount of organic gases and night gendioxide and prioritize these types of projects. the next is project delivery. we give fund to these that are completed within two years. we look at program diversity which means we develop a program of diverse project types and serves multiple constituents and we have other considerations and we consider projects look to see if the project sponsor has fulfilled monitoring programs for any previous project and we look to make sure p
over to puc, i brought it to the puc. and the whole issue was to really help us do small projects instead of doing plans and specs and going out and advertising, joc was the vehicle that you can actually perform that. and, so, we've been working, trying to include more local businesses. we went out with the -- we spearheaded the micro joc where it's a micro set aside for small businesses. and we've looked at bonding issues on joc. so, we've done a lot to really make joc, you know, palatable to a lot of small businesses. and what miguel mentioned, we are very proud about that. i think the issue, you know, as far as the audit is concerned is actually pointing out some things that we acknowledge and there are some thing we want to fix. there are some things we don't agree and we've said much that we don't agree, i think on one issue. but we i think -- we will take the responses of the contractors and also the gordon group and the ah auditor to make sure we address their issues. but i think overall it's a great program. it gives us the ability to do projects faster and save the rate p
't lose the people that make san francisco so special. we keep everybody here and that allow us to recover our economy, and everything because it's so interdependent. >> so that is a difficult goal but i think we can achieve it over the long time so thank you very much for hosting us and hosting this great exhibit, and thank you very much for joining >> i am jeff idakia, and i provide legal representation to 20,000 people every year. it is our goal to ensure that we have the best legal representation possible. we started this nine years ago, to increased consciousness and awareness of the issues that affect public safety in criminal and juvenile justice reform. i am proud to say that this is the ninth summit. we take on issues like closing the california youth authority. and we in the confinement of youth -- young children in -- and the prisoner re-entry program and abolishing the death penalty. we take on three critical issues. the first panel has a riveting discussion about gangs. and reducing gang violence. on our panel are former gang members, gang intervention workers, police, public
everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of 12,000 loans worth $4.2 billion. in 2009, the sba approved $500 million in lending. next, we have the executive director of the san francisco small business office. she was in san francisco in 1986 to open the buffalo exchange limited store, and in the 13 years she worked for buffalo exchange, tennis district manager, she held her open the company from four to 11 stores. in 2009, the mayor appointed her as executive director to the office of small businesses. next, we have the ceo of opportunity funds. he has combined his background as a community organizer with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in califor
. that is right in their box. for us, the capacity for us to do the smaller side is not there as much as it is for them. on getting a loan through my side of the bank, i do not require an account to do that. we would like to have it, but i do not require it. >> last question for the opportunity fund and a critic representative. are you a cdfi? is san francisco and s.p.a. in support of cdfi's being established in san francisco? >> yes, we are. we were founded in 1999 with a small business loan. that is how we started our tenderloin office. >> opportunity fund is a certified cdfi, so we are providing a benefit to low and moderate-income communities. he is the city establishing support for new cdfi's? >> mark wanted to address that, in support of cdfi's in the city. >> we have a wealth of partners in the city. s.p.a. is just now rolling out a program for r -- will be the case by the summer. let me get one last point and on the question about relationships to lenders. the question was, do have to have an account with a bank in order to get a loan? may answer is no, but the real answer to
. i don't think you're -- i mean we have a gay community center and you're not using it for outreach to get to the people to tell you how to spend the money to calm the traffic down. i mean we have better streets. we have smart streets. i mean you can lump it into different programs, different names, different acronyms, but people are seeing the traffic calm and pedestrian safety for everybody, and you know if you're going to be spending this money i think that it should be looked at at market and guerrero. we need to slow the traffic down there especially in the morning when drivers are trying to get downtown so thank you. >> thank you. is there anyone else that would like to speak from the public? seeing none public comment is closed. i did want to make a comment that i think dr. -- [inaudible] from the department of public health and others can quantify when you have successful traffic calming projects or slow down 5 miles per hour around schools or key areas it saves lives and i think it's really important and makes sense to shift to the arterials strategically but i hope
might as well put it on those municipal buildings where it reduces the amount of energy use which reduce our loss. so, we're looking at balancing that versus go solar which you give rebates to private citizens. so, these are all the things that we're considering we need to talk with all stakeholders. >> what is the deadline to sunset on solar deductions? >> on the go solar sf program, it's currently concludes in 2018. >> i know you said 2018 for this program. i was referring to the state program in terms of -- >> there isn't a deadline for the california solar incentive. >> i thought -- so it's still in existence? >> it's still in existence. the dollar amount available ratchets down over time, but i don't believe it's projected to go to zero. >> okay. but pretty close? >> yeah. >> all right. commissioner vietor? >> i would be interested, since we are in the thick of the clean power sf conversations, to hear more specifically how this go solar program could be tied to go solar customers -- i mean, to clean power sf customers. and also some thoughts around kind of the marketing and framing
in this play so that later, when we come talk to you, you can tell us how you would handle these situations. so it's time for you to use your mind and listen so you can learn how to make the wise choice, the right choice, to be leaders instead of followers. did i forget to mention? the name of this play is the fall of (inaudible). drop dead. >> what's up, what's up. >> welcome to the prologue. how are you doing out there? >> great. >> i said, how are you doing out there? all right, all right, now be quiet. we are here today to save your lives. maybe, it can happen, just listen. we're just like you, we're students. we got some students from john f. kennedy high school, and here we got some students from martin luther king junior high school out there. and we'd like to give a special shout out to assistant principal braxton. we'd like to present something for you to think about and then come to your groups and talk about it and hopefully we end something and hopefully we don't end our lives in tragedy. this isn't tragedy like the ancient greeks used to do like sophocles and euripides. we h
. >> yes. >>> so good for all of us. thank you very much. >> thank you. yes. mr. dicosta. >>> i wanted to talk a little bit about espinola jackson and the water system improvement project and the bond measure. may i take the liberty to first wish one of your commissioners on friday, it's your birthday and that's because you are my facebook. [laughter] >>> and i want to wish -- i want to express my deep condolances to karen cubic on the passing of her father. karen is -- karen, myself share something very deep and i appreciate her very hard work. now, having said that, on espinola jackson, you know that she is one of the last leaders left that can do what she does, you know. she does it openly and she's very forthright, and i appreciate very much on behalf of the whole community the bayview hunters point for what you all did for her today. and god will bless you for that. on the water system improvement project, we have accomplished a lot. and my only hope is that understanding what we did with the water system improvement project, that we bring forward the finer projects and apply them
that would be a very effective means for him to intervene. in dealing with the violent us youth, they need to make them understand that they have done something, there will be repercussions, there will be consequences. they will have to serve their time, but not get lost in the shuffle. prison can have two or facts. it can make someone want to be more productive member of society or they can become more integrated into the gang lifestyle. these individuals can go in and aligned with these groups and now they come out and they are more respected in the community in the wrong aspect and they're going to do something more severe. we need to -- was these people go to prison, do not lose touch with them. meet them when they are being sentenced. >> i love something you just did. you said "he needs to" and a new corrected yourself and said "we need to." we need to be thinking along those lines. you are basically out of prison, correct? you have grown up in richmond, an area that is labeled gang infested. when you listen to this, how do each of you react? what do think of what he is saying? could
constructive steps to remove the barriers. the ada gives us some guidance on that. readily achievable says it can be done quickly and easily without a whole lot of steps. feasible means that it may require a lot more money, a lot more alteration to get that done. under the ada, you need to be surveying your property and putting together both a short- term plan and a long-term plan. the short term plan is going to be the readily achievable solution. the long-term plan could take 20 years. i do not know. your business might not be making huge profits. you may need to be saving money for the long term. but it is your obligation to plan for the long term as well as the short term. the ada has a set of priorities that guide you on how you will be serving your property. the ada says a certain party of getting in the front door, but you are logical, you want your customers to access your services. be that steps, be that ramps, if the door is not wide enough, if the landing is not level enough. priority two is actually travel. once you get into your business and start speculating the wits of your
the fact that all of us even though he's not in district 9 we hear from him on different issues that identifies out there and i think that kind of enthusiasm should be reawarded and i am happy to support his reappointment. >> thank you. i wanted to to ask ms. geary we have district three rep and a district six rep and i am wondering -- so mr. flanagan is in the mix of these applicants even though we don't have his application so he is being considered. there is a bunch of people in district three and six on the list as well. are we to defer to the supervisors for these appointments? i think we heard from commissioner kim for her preference. have he heard from supervisor david chiu of district three? >> no. we have not yet heard from supervisor chiu. >> okay. >> regarding the question the appointees are not district specific so they are traditionally have been to ensure that we have representation throughout the city, all perspectives are represented. traditionally i think we have -- our experience has been that there's been some deference to the actual commissioner regard
and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my life. somebody would say that this is a gang memb
walk out feeling great. >> if you feel comfortable using computers and you have patience, we want you on our team. >> would you show me how to type? >> [speaking in spanish]. >> will you help me learn more? >> hey, guys, nona here with the weekly buzz. it's mid february and there's tons of affordable events happening throughout the city. grab your valentine and get ready to have some fun. here are my topics for the week. this thursday, february 14th, bring your special someone or just your admiration for romantic music for a night of flamingo music. and other renowned musicians combine rowman i can music of i go far with footwork and song. dinner will be served throughout the performance so make your reservation early to ensure great view. okay. maybe valentine's day isn't your thing. well, have no fear because sf is here and there's over 300 events celebrating san francisco's craft fair legacies throughout the city. one event that i'm really looking forward to is the brewery blow out at speaks easy lauger. friday, february 15, enjoy 15 rare and limited beer on tap to live music and h
continue. >> pardon me? >> we're trying to wrap up the meeting. >> okay. i am just using my time if that is okay. all right. thank you. >> thank you. anyone else from the public that would like to speak? seeing none public comment is closed. ms. ching please call the next item. >> item 13 public comment. >> let's open this up. anyone from the public who would like to speak? seeing none. mis ching any other items? >> no. next item is adjournment. >> thank you. we're adjourned. 88. we are at mount davidson and it has the highest point of elevation in san francisco hitting a whopping 928 feet. mt. davidson provides a peaceful 30-acre owe ace and great hiking trails. the spectacular views offers a perfect place to watch the sunrise or suffer sun set with someone you louvre, wear sturdy shows to conquer the stone trails and denly inventory advantage gives you hikers the sensation of being in a rain forest it's quite a hike to the top here at mount davidson but the view
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46